Lady Dragon, Tela Du book review

I hate doing this, but it’s about time I DNFed25873539 this book. I’m done. It’s annoying the heck out of me, it’s been almost a year, and I don’t want to finish. 

I’m giving it two stars instead of one because–I don’t know–it could get better? Also, I really like Kendra E. Ardnek. She’s a great inspiration to many, even me at one point, and it’s amazing what she’s done.
But this book is not my cup of tea. I did enjoy Water princess, Fire Prince, but that was also years ago and my opinions have changed since then.
Here comes the list.

(mild spoilers ahead)
What I did not like about the 43% I read of Lady Dragon, Tela Du :
–Too much backstory. It’s hard to keep track of it all. There are ten rulers or something who came from our world, and then seven people, and the timelines are different between our worlds. Very reminiscent of Narnia, but not as good because Narnia came first, did it well, and didn’t have a ton of backstory to remember.
–Petra was Gosh. Dang. Annoying. She was mean to everyone and I didn’t understand the whole thing with the accent or her obsession with purple. She was really possessive of Reuben and unsupportive of his decisions even though she claimed to be his best friend. Really uncool. That’s not a healthy relationship. I’m also surprised Reuben never called her out on her BS. (well, he might have, but I probably didn’t read it)
–Reuben was creepy. He seemed like a great guy but the way he’s still after Petra even after she keeps telling him it’s not going to happen (not to mention how mean she is) is incredibly stalkerish and problematic. She should have gotten a restraining order or something.
–Respect each other already. Petra–let him have a girlfriend. Reuben–you’re a creepy stalker man.
–And they’re being forced into a marriage at 16. Not cool not cool. They basically have no say in the matter. It’s either get married, or fail to save the world.
–The parents are okay with forcing their children into this arrangement. NOT COOL. Just cause it worked for you doesn’t mean it will work for them.
–Bend some rules already. It’s 2018. You can rule together without being married.
–(and Petra goes from not wanting to ever go beyond friends to wanting his babies??!? TRIGGERED)
–The only person I like is Laura. I also like Amber. She’s cool.

These are just my opinions on the book. Who knows? You might like it. But if you’re triggered by arranged marriages and Narnia ripoffs, stay away.
I also really hate to write one of the only negative reviews of this book, but these issues need to be addressed.

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Finding Gold

I read the first page. I watch the first episode.

Something about it is different.

I cant put the book down. I click “next episode”.

It’s captured me and I don’t want it to let go.

I close the book. The end credits roll.

It’s all over.


There’s just something all so real about fallingimg_1209 in love with a story. I’ve nearly forgotten what it feels like. But, over the last few days, I’ve fallen in love with Death Note.

It was sudden. It was beautiful. I was staying up until the wee hours of the morning telling myself “just one more”, watching episode after episode. I cheered for the characters, cried when they died (it kinda happened a lot), and thought over the moral message it was portraying. Is it alright to kill people if you’re doing it for all good reasons?

I found something worth as much as gold. I found a new fandom. 

Just like falling in love with a person, it’s easy to look past the flaws, to get excited whenever you hear someone talking about them, and you’re sad when it’s over. (for me, that was 2 A.M. this morning. #sorrynotsorry).

There are so many reasons to declare a story we love as precious to us. One is that they change us. If it wasn’t for Doctor Who, I probably wouldn’t have gotten explorative when it comes to genres. 

Some of us go years without finding a story that we connect with. Some of us love every story we come across. For me, I don’t remember finding a good story in my teen years until I read the Tales of Goldstone Wood series by Anne Elisabeth Stengl a couple years back. Since then I’ve discovered Doctor WhoHarry Potter, and a handful of other stories that I love to pieces.

It’s hard to find something that you’ll enjoy. Sometimes it’s predictable, but you can’t predict that moment when you find what you’re looking for, even if you weren’t aware of what that was. 

My ramblings might not make much sense today, but one thing I want to say is that you should continue exploring.

Look for the stories that touch you and change you. When you find them, don’t let them go, and never stop searching. 


See y’all later ❤

Catherine

reread.

Books I own and have reread. (Dragonwitch by Anne Elisabeth Stengl is the only one missing)

A long long time ago when I was younger (okay, maybe only a year ago) I would have told you that I never reread books.

Why?

Because despite having a terrible memory, I remembered too much for it to be a worthwhile experience. Because I wouldn’t want to waste my time on something I’ve already completed. They mystery is gone, you already went on that journey. Why bother with it again?

This used to be my thinking. I would look at a book and long to read it again, but something in the back of my head would tell me that I’ve already read it. I already know what happens. I liked it, but there are more important things to devote my time to.

But recently, I’ve taken to rereading books, and I’ve discovered just how much fun it can be.

When reading a good book for the first time, you expose yourself to a new world, new characters, new themes, and scenes. When that story is over, it’s left in your memory as a good time and you move on.

Incarceron by Catherine Fisher. reread 7/31

Rereading gives you the opportunity to return to that story, experience those events again. It’s almost like reliving a certain part in your life. Sometimes while rereading, you can remember when and where you were while reading that book, or rediscovering scenes and characters you had forgotten about, or laid dormant in your memory, or themes that you’ve never seen before.

I’ve reread so many books in the last year and each one was an enjoyable experience. Instead of pursuing a new adventure, it’s like reading a diary: something you experienced once, preserved for you to read it again. Instead of diving into the uncertain, it’s curling up in front of the fire with a familiar tome, safe in the arms of the familiar.

So, I can say with certainty that I will be rereading more books in the future: reliving adventures, falling in love with characters again, and learning new things along the way.

I hope that wasn’t too confusing (pardon my rambling thoughts).

God bless,

Catherine